Three Facts About Skeletons

Fact #1:

Skeletons are extremely unhappy being locked inside the muscle tissue of the body. For this reason, they attempt to break free by piercing the gum region of the mouth. First, they send a series of bones to scout the region. These are known as baby teeth. Once the baby teeth take their initial readings, they are relieved by stronger teeth who attempt to push fully out. This is why some people have teeth that appear to be very long; it shows a skeleton is working harder than most to free itself. Luckily, though, few skeletons make a complete escape.

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Fact #2:

Technically speaking, the word ‘skeleton’ refers to the bone structure only when it is within a body. A bone structure that escapes, is removed, or is exposed over time after death and decomposition, is referred to in two different ways. Some say, ‘skeletout’ (given the last syllable of skeleton rhymes with ‘in’) whereas other say ‘skeletoff’ (given the last two letters of skeleton or ‘on’). Unfortunately, the Federation of Bone Experts has waffled on the issue, refusing to make a definitive decree. For this reason, several bone-related conferences and seminars have ended in brawls between skeletout and skeletoff factions.

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Fact #3:

Many believe the Fox television show Bones is named for the central character, Dr. Temperance “Bones” Brennan, but this is not the case. The real reason, according to a 2006 TV Guide interview with creator Hart Hanson, is because bones are something everyone in the cast has in common. “We were really struggling,” Hanson said, “because there are all these great characters, but they didn’t have much in common outside of where they work. So then I was like, ‘Wait a minute, how are all these people standing and moving all the time? Like, why aren’t they constantly collapsing into weird piles of skin and fat and ligament?’ And my assistant was like, ‘Well, because they have skeletons made of bones,’ and I was like, ‘Boom! That’s it!’” Other common traits they considered as show names include: FBI, Faces, Skin, Can Whistle, and Butts.

Deathly Honest by Eduardo Ely

Eduardo Ely is a skeleton from Brazil. The skeleton is covered in muscle and skin, and inside the skull there’s a brain. The brain sends messages to the body, and the finger bones and muscles work to create delightfully funny illustrations and designs. So, technically, we could say Eduardo Ely is an illustrator and designer. But we really don’t want to lose the fact that, a few layers down, we’re all just a bunch of bones.

Follow Eduardo on Instagram and Twitter for more great stuff.

Three Facts About Skeletons

Fact #1:

Skeletons are extremely unhappy being locked inside the muscle tissue of the body. For this reason, they attempt to break free by piercing the gum region of the mouth. First, they send a series of bones to scout the region. These are known as baby teeth. Once the baby teeth take their initial readings, they are relieved by stronger teeth who attempt to push fully out. This is why some people have teeth that appear to be very long; it shows a skeleton is working harder than most to free itself. Luckily, though, few skeletons make a complete escape.

__

Fact #2:

Technically speaking, the word ‘skeleton’ refers to the bone structure only when it is within a body. A bone structure that escapes, is removed, or is exposed over time after death and decomposition, is referred to in two different ways. Some say, ‘skeletout’ (given the last syllable of skeleton rhymes with ‘in’) whereas other say ‘skeletoff’ (given the last two letters of skeleton or ‘on’). Unfortunately, the Federation of Bone Experts has waffled on the issue, refusing to make a definitive decree. For this reason, several bone-related conferences and seminars have ended in brawls between skeletout and skeletoff factions.

__

Fact #3:

Many believe the Fox television show Bones is named for the central character, Dr. Temperance “Bones” Brennan, but this is not the case. The real reason, according to a 2006 TV Guide interview with creator Hart Hanson, is because bones are something everyone in the cast has in common. “We were really struggling,” Hanson said, “because there are all these great characters, but they didn’t have much in common outside of where they work. So then I was like, ‘Wait a minute, how are all these people standing and moving all the time? Like, why aren’t they constantly collapsing into weird piles of skin and fat and ligament?’ And my assistant was like, ‘Well, because they have skeletons made of bones,’ and I was like, ‘Boom! That’s it!’” Other common traits they considered as show names include: FBI, Faces, Skin, Can Whistle, and Butts.

Ever broken a bone?